Onnellisuus – Happiness

Onnellisuus is a sculpture consisting of six wood cubes that form an abstract installation. The word ‘Onnellisuus’ is Finnish for ‘happiness’.

I believe we build our own happiness based on what we consider important in life and what we give priority, for example health, family, friends, love, beauty or wealth. We all define happiness differently depending on our priorities, values, aspirations etc. I believe happiness is a choice, a personal choice that needs to be constructed every day.

The six wood cubes that make Onnellisuus, and that can be piled or placed in different ways is an allegory of happiness and a call to choose and construct your happiness every day.

The wood the sculpture is made of, was taken from nature in a respectful manner. It comes from trees that fell down when the Amacuzac River flooded in September 2013. The Amacuzac River flows through the state of Morelos, Mexico. This is where I grew limes until the river flooded and took the orchard with it. Loosing the orchard was painful. Nothing remained of years of work. But the flood also brought big pieces of drift wood and tree trunks. I then decided to use the drift wood in my art work, to turn the pain and loss of the orchard into something new, to construct happiness on what the river had left us.

Data:
Davit Nava, Onnellisuus, 2016, acrylic on post-natural-disaster wood, 9.0 x 10.6 x 48.0 in / 23 x 27 x 122 cm

Onnellisuus1
Onnellisuus, front view. Photo by Pablo Vicente
Onnellisuus2
Onnellisuus detail. Photo by Pablo Vicente
Onnellisuus4
Onnellisuus detail. Photo by Pablo Vicente

 

Nopal leaf abstract No.2

The Nopal leaf abstract No. 2 with its contrasting sides is an invitation to reflect on order and control versus chaos as well as a representation of the vast number of cultures that inhabit Mexico today.

One side of the Nopal leaf is painted in colorful, abstract forms as a kaleidoscopic metaphor representing the diversity of the vast number of ancient and modern cultures that inhabit Mexico today, as well as their world visions. The other side is painted in gold with black color melting from top to bottom, representing a more sober color contrast than the previous side.

The reason for the contrasting sides is to visualize order versus chaos. The abstract, kaleidoscopic side, with its straight lines, represent control and order. The other side, with its melting black lines represent fluency and chaos.

The ten “tunas” – or prickly pears – are made out of clay, covered with crystal and silver (.925) beads.

Data:
Davit Nava, Nopal leaf, No.2, 2016, painted iron stand, post-use plastic bags, used clothing with white glue, acrylic on clay, crystal and silver (.925) beads, 7.8 x 15.7 x 21.6 in / 20 x 40 x 55 cm. Nopal leaf No.2 belongs to a private collector.

 

 

IMG_0044
Nopal leaf No. 2 Side representing order and control.
IMG_0043
Nopal leaf No. 2 Side representing fluency and chaos.

Nopal leaf abstract

Nopal leaf abstract sculpture.

The Nopal leaf is an abstract sculpture, each side with a different color scheme. The two “tunas” – or prickly pears – are made out of clay, covered with crystal beads and a crystal bead flower. The flowers are Wixáritari beadwork.

The natural shape of the Nopal leaf is painted in colorful, abstract forms as a kaleidoscopic metaphor representing the diversity of the vast number of ancient and modern cultures that inhabit Mexico today, as well as their world visions.

Data:
Davit Nava, Nopal leaf, No.1, 2015, painted iron stand, post-use plastic bags, used clothing with white glue, acrylic on clay, crystal beads, 7.8 x 7.8 x 20.8 in / 20 x 20 x 53 cm. Nopal leaf belongs to a private collector.

Face A.
Face B.
Prickly pears detail.
Prickly pears detail.
Flower, Wixáritari bead work.
Flower, Wixáritari beadwork.
Side face view.
Side face view.

All photos by: Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña.

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Leopoldo, the hybrid gecko

Leopoldo, the hybrid gecko.

Leopoldo is a hybrid gecko inspired by three different animals; a bee, a snake and a gecko.

Leopoldo's tail
Leopoldo in the process of making. Tail covered with beads.

Its body and face are those of an Asian gecko, the Eublepharis macularis. The bi-color tail was inspired by a Honduran milk snake, the Lampropeltis triangulum hondurensis, and its wings by a common honey bee, the Apis mellifera.

All geckos have five fingers in each hand and leg, just like humans do. However, as you can see, Leopoldo only has three fingers. This is because it is an allegory to our digital era, in which we use our fingers more than our feet.

Leopoldo is available at Ethos Arte, Tienda en linea.

Data:
Davit Nava, Leopoldo, 2014, iron structure, post-use plastic bags, used clothing with white glue, acrylic on clay, stained glass, crystal beads, 18.5 x 9.8 x 6.3 in / 47 x 25 x 16 cm.

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gecko-arriba
Leopoldo from above – with snake tail and honey bee wings. Photo by: Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña.
gecko-cola
Tail of Leopoldo from above. Photo by: Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña.
cara-gecko
Leopoldo’s head from above. Photo by: Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña.

The Think-Rethink Chair

The Think-Rethink Chair is a chair that cannot be used for sitting.
The Think-Rethink Chair in process. Adding the beads.
The Think-Rethink Chair in process. Adding the beads.

The Think-Rethink Chair is a chair that cannot be used for sitting. It is an invitation to rethink our relationships with everyday objects as well as a nod to the folkloric and traditional techniques of Mexico.

Normally, we use our tables, beds or chairs for their purposes. But how would it change our relationship with them if it were impossible to use them?

This piece invites us to rethink a new relationship with objects based purely on the contemplation and the non-use of it.

In parallel, the chair’s colors and techniques, invite the viewer to look into the traditions and cultures of Mexico. The beads honor the Wixáritari people that use them in their ritual sacrifices, and their colorful and delicate craftsmanship, gluing thousands of glass beads, hours and hours, in order to create one piece. The use of the vinyl thread makes a nod to the famous Acapulco chair that is woven using this particular thread.

The Think-Rethink Chair in process.
The Think-Rethink Chair in process.

The Think-Rethink Chair simply aims to be enjoyed without being used for its original function, as well as it honors Mexico’s traditional crafts people that beautify our daily life.

The Think-Rethink Chair is available at Ethos Arte, Tienda en línea.

Data
Davit Nava, The Think-Rethink Chair, 2015, iron structure and crystal beads, 17.7 x 18.1 x 37.8 in / 45 x 46 x 96 cm

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front view of The Cool-Cool chair
Front view of The Think-Rethink Chair. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Top view Cool-Cool Chair
Top view of The Think-Rethink Chair. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña

Lola, the hybrid python

Lola is a hybrid python. She is inspired by two species of snakes; Morelia viridis y Dendroaspis angusticeps.
Lola and Davit
Lola and Davit

Lola is a hybrid python. She is inspired by two species of snakes; Morelia viridis y Dendroaspis angusticeps.

This piece intends to invite the viewer to a new relationship with nature, a relationship of admiration and respect, as no animal should have to live in captivity or have to be killed in order for humans to appreciate its beauty and shapes.

 

 

Lola, mounted on a black sheet metal box
Lola, mounted on a black sheet metal box

Lola is mounted on a black sheet metal box, seeking to embellish an interior with shapes and colors of nature. The beads are an allegory to and in honor of the craftsmanship of the Wixáritari people.

Lola is presently my largest piece with a length of 70 in/180 cm. Lola is available at Ethos Arte, Tienda en línea.

Sculpting Lola's head with clay
Sculpting Lola’s head with clay

Data:
Davit Nava, Lola, 2015, iron structure, post-use plastic bags, used clothing with white glue, acrylic on clay, crystal beads, 70 x 48 x 4.72 in / 180 x 122 x 12 cm

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arriving at Ethos Arte (Facebook)
Lola, close-up at Ethos Arte (Facebook)
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Lola snake front view
Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Lola's face detail
Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña

Nopalera, an allegory of diversity

La Nopalera, an allegory

The colors and shapes of the Nopalera are an allegory of the immense diversity of climates, flowers, animals and traditions that exist in the Mexican State of Morelos.

This sculpture has 33 tunas – or prickly pears – as a clear reference to the 33 municipalities that Morelos has.

The fact that the tunas are white and have a rough surface, was done with the intention to emphasize an aesthetic balance with the leaves’ multiple colors and smooth surface.

It can be noticed that one of the leaves hosts a little blue bird commonly known as “Western Bluebird” (or “Azulejo” in Spanish) and whose scientific name is Sialia mexicana. This species inhabits the open coniferous forests of Morelos as well as its farmlands. The fact that the bird was placed posing on one leaf, was done with the intention that the people of Morelos would become aware of the natural wide diversity, quite often unknown for many of the inhabitants of this small but colorful State.

Last summer, in 2015, this piece participated in the annual Popular Art Award at the Museo Morelense de Arte Popular (MMAPO) in Cuernavaca, Mexico.

Data:
Davit Nava, Nopalera, 2015, paperboad and wooden base, 19.6 x 19.6 x 35.5 in / 50 x 50 x 90 cm

Nopalera's detail. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera’s detail. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera's Azulejo bird detail. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera’s Azulejo bird detail. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña
Nopalera. Photo by Pamela Daryl Hernández Magaña

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